Mizuno Shoe Size Chart

mizuno-shoe-size-chart

This is the Mizuno shoe size chart for men, women, and youth.

Originating out in Japan, Mizuno is still sticking to that Japanese philosophy saying “if it’s not broke, don’t change it.”

So, if you are someone who wants to wear the same shoe in ten years’ time, chances are Mizuno is going to be a great brand for you because they don’t change a whole lot.

Without further ado, these are the Mizuno shoe size charts you’re looking for…

Related: Do Mizuno Shoes Run Small, Big, or True To Size?

Mizuno Shoe Size Chart

Mizuno Men’s Size Chart

USA Japan UK EU
5 23.0 4 36.5
5.5 23.5 4.5 37
6 24.0 5 38
6.5 24.5 5.5 38.5
7 25.0 6 39
7.5 25.0 6.5 40
8 26.0 7 40.5
8.5 26.5 7.5 41
9 27.0 8 42
9.5 27.5 8.5 42.5
10 28.0 9 43
10.5 28.5 9.5 44
11 29.0 10 44.5
11.5 29.5 10.5 45
12 30.0 11 46
12.5 30.5 11.5 46.5
13 31.0 12 47
13.5 31.5 12.5 48
14 32.0 13 48.5
14.5 32.5 13.5  
15 33.0 14 50
15.5 33.5 14.5  
16 34.0 15 51
16.5 34.5 15.5  
17 35.0 16 52.5

Related: Hoka Size Chart

Mizuno Women’s Size Chart

USA Japan UK EU
4 20.5 1.5 33
4.5 21.0 2 34
5 21.5 2.5 34.5
5.5 22.0 3 35
6 22.5 3.5 36
6.5 23.0 4 36.5
7 23.5 4.5 37
7.5 24.0 5 38
8 24.5 5.5 38.5
8.5 25.0 6 39
9 25.5 6.5 40
9.5 26.0 7 40.5
10 26.5 7.5 41
10.5 27.0 8 42
11 27.5 8.5 42.5
11.5 28.0 9 43
12 28.5 9.5 44
12.5 29.0 10 44.5
13 29.5 10.5 45

Related: Brooks Size Chart

Mizuno Youth Size Chart

USA UK EU CM
3.5 2.5 35 21.5
4 3 35.5 22
4.5 3.5 36 22.5
5 4 36.5 23
5.5 4.5 37 23.5
6 5 38 24
6.5 5.5 38.5 24.5
7 6 39 25

 

Mizuno Shoe Sizes vs. Nike, Asics, Brooks, Adidas

Men’s US Sizes

Foot Length
(mm)
Mizuno Nike Adidas Asics Brooks
260 9 9 9 8 8
270 9 10 10 9 9
280 10 11 11 10 10

Women’s US Sizes

Foot Length
(mm)
Mizuno Nike Adidas Asics Brooks
230 6.5 6.5 6.5 6 6
240 7.5 7.5 7.5 7 7
250 8.5 8.5 8.5 8 8

 

How Do Mizuno Shoes Fit

Mizuno shoes are known to be very comfortable on foot.

While the…

  • Wave Rider 24 WaveKnit (not mesh),
  • Wave Rider 25 Mesh,
  • Wave Rider Neo,
  • Wave Inspire 17,
  • Wave Horizon 5,
  • Wave Sky 5,

    … run true to size, the Wave Rider 24 Mesh runs long and the Wave Rebellion runs a quarter size small.

You can check our latest article discussing whether Mizuno shoes run small or big.

Now let’s quickly touch on some of the best Mizuno running shoes…

Best Mizuno Running Shoes

Some things are innovative, other things have stayed the exact same for years and will continue to stay the same.

Overall, Mizuno shoes are quite similar to Asics using each other’s ideas. Both are heavy road running shoes and kind of firmer shoes and they kind of bounce off each other in that way for sure.

Overall, Mizuno is a great brand and has been around for quite a long time. Brands that are doing something right obviously are going to stay around for a long time.

If you’re someone who tends to chew through a max cushion shoe like a Saucony Triumph or Hurricane, some of your Brooks shoes, or even some of the Hokas and you need something more stable and more durable, look towards a Mizuno.

The problem is you’re just not going to get that really soft plush feel and that nice bounce-back that you would be used to in some of those other brands.

Related: Do Saucony Run Small or True To Size?

Mizuno Wave Inspire

The only difference between the Wave Inspire and Wave Rider is in the midsole and upper. On the Inspire, Mizuno have altered the wave plate making it slightly bit thicker on the medial side.

Mizuno are trying to add some reinforcement through the medial side for people who need more support there.

So, if you do find yourself landing on that medial side and having quite an unstable ankle, the Wave Inspire actually does work well as far as the stability system goes. 

It’s got a dialed-in upper with a slightly slimmer fit, but it’s a bit shallow through the toe box. It fits true to size and even probably a half size small.

Mizuno Wave Rider

Related: Mizuno Wave Rider 24 vs 25

The Wave Rider is very similar to the Wave Inspire except the Rider is designed for neutral runners. So, if you’re somebody who has a low arch or a medium arch, look more so towards the Inspire.

However, if you have a medium arch or a slightly higher arch and a foot that doesn’t move too much side-to-side, I would be looking more so towards the Wave Rider.

The Rider does utilize a very similar system except for the wave plate isn’t doubled-up on the inside. So, you’ve got that single-layer wave plate running from your heel to slightly through your midfoot.

Compared to previous models, the Wave Rider now uses a full-length Enerzy midsole. This new midsole is softer than ever and the forefoot is more flexible than ever.

Let’s move to the upper range in the Mizuno line…

Related: Mizuno Wave Rider vs Brooks Ghost

Mizuno Wave Sky

The Sky is your neutral running shoe and the Horizon is going to be the stability version.

Again, if you’re someone who rolls in a bit more or you have a lower arch, go towards the Horizon. And if you’re someone with a higher arch and a more rigid foot, look towards the Sky.

The Sky is a nice plush cushioned neutral daily trainer. Some people even say it’s too soft. The cushioning system works really nicely pretty much all the way through the shoe.

The Sky is very soft and responsive but quite durable at the same time. The mesh version has an engineered mesh wrapping around the whole foot with a nice firm heel counter around the back.

One thing people have said with the Wave Sky is that they kind of get that little bit of heel slippage just because the heel counter isn’t as deep as the Rider or some other shoes on the market.

Overall, the Sky creates quite a nice midfoot and forefoot lockdown and the shoe fits pretty true to size.

Related: Softest Running Shoes

Mizuno Wave Horizon

The Horizon has very similar characteristics and build as the Sky. The only difference is in the medial side wave pattern. On the Horizon, they’re going for a more box shape. Also, the stability system in this shoe is quite decent.

It works great for that rearfoot, midfoot, as well as that forefoot pronator. If you are that unstable runner or just kind of forefoot pronate, the Horizon, as well as the Hoka Arahi, is the only shoe on the market to accommodate forefoot pronation.

If you’re a heel striker, the Horizon offers a slightly more cushioning underneath that fat heel.

The upper is quite dialed-in and it’s going to accommodate mild to severe overpronation and it fits slightly wider through that midfoot area.

So, if you have a low-to-medium arch and you do have quite a flexible foot, this is actually a good shoe working on a 10mm drop.

Related: Hoka Clifton 7 vs 8

Mizuno Wave Knit Uppers

Mizuno make really nice wave knit uppers. Their knit uppers do offer a nice seamless stretchy toe box area which offers a slight bit more depth to their shoes. It’s in between Nike’s Flyknit and New Balance’s Hypoknit.

Wave Knit is actually a nice addition to the Mizuno range. They do it in the Wave Sky, Wave Rider, and Wave Inspire, but I don’t think they do it in the Wave Horizon just because you don’t really want a stretchy upper on a stability running shoe.

Wave Knit is supposed to be a one-piece woven knit that’s more durable and wraps around the foot really nicely.

If you get irritated by a mesh upper or an internal toe guard at the front, look towards a knit shoe.

That’s it for today. We’ve looked into the Mizuno shoe size chart, talked about how Mizuno shoes fit and quickly reviewed some of the best Mizuno running shoes.

See you in the next one. 

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